feather_ghyll: Illustration of the Chalet against a white background with blue border (Chalet School)
Here are some links I have meant to post for a good long while:

The Chalet School at War review by Did You Ever Stop to Think

From the same blog, a thought-provoking analysis of the first page of ‘The School at the Chalet’.

Also, a review of Head Girl of the Chalet School

And her Chalet School tag

[dreamwidth.org profile] el_staplador sings the praises of 'Ballet Shoes’ (from a feminist standpoint) here.

I couldn't see who whad written about coming to Anne Shirley for the first time as an adult at Vulpes Libris.

A review of Miss Buncle’s Book by Carrie S, which I found charming. My first D.E. Stevenson book was 'Amberwell', which I probably was too young for. I liked the idea of children growing up in a stately family home, but was quite upset that their lives turned out to be sad and full of strife. I find Stevenson variable in quality, but 'Miss Buncle’s Book' is one of my favourite books of hers,

The author of the recently reviewed Tam Lin can be found on Livejournal/Dreamwidth [livejournal.com profile] pameladean/[dreamwidth.org profile] pameladean.

Finally, and this is relatively breaking news, the BBC is adapting 'Little Women'.
feather_ghyll: Tennis ball caught up at mid net's length with text reading 15 - love (Anyone for tennis?)
This itty-bitty post is bought to you by there being no Olympics on TV for another four years. I expect that the people running it would want more attention to be given to heartwarming stories about sportsmanship rather than other, less ennobling things. And so I oblige.

I did want to mention the hockey, because I found myself watching the exciting women's gold medal match on Friday, I think it was. Wasn't the British goalie amazing? Or should I say English? In the tradition of talking enthusiastically about a sport I know nothing about, are there seriously no outstanding Scottish or Welsh hockey players?

Anyway, international hockey is fierce based on that match and what little else I saw from Rio. There was talk of stitches and wired jaws! It doesn't come off as so violent in girls own books. I know there is talk of sticks and wild play when new girls play for the first time and, yes, there are injuries, but they're usually predictable and in service to the story: one player is injured so she can no longer play and the new girl in the fourth or the rebel who didn't impress the games captain at the start of term can show her mettle.

The force of watching top-class female team sports did strike me anew these Olympics.

LINKS: Two

May. 18th, 2014 08:28 am
feather_ghyll: Close-up of white flower aganst dark background (Black and white flower)
Both from The Guardian:

Where are all the heroines in YA fiction?: firebird

This feature wanders away, somewhat, from the original question, to discuss covers and marketing, but ends with some recommendations.

Here is an obituary for Mary Stewart, who has passed away at the age of 97, by Rachel Hore. I found it sympathetic and enlightening about certain aspects of Stewart's books. I greatly enjoyed her romantic suspense novels.
feather_ghyll: Lavendar flowers against white background (Beautiful flower (lavender))
I've just posted a link to a feature about the rise and rise of Novak Djokovic at [livejournal.com profile] tennisfans. I'm really looking forward to the French and the grass season!

In other news, BBC Films has announced that it's doing a new adaptation of Swallows and Amazons. My advice would be to play it straight and not to shoehorn a Harry Potter actor in if they're not right for the part. Actually, the possibilities of where they could position cameras in terms of POV are exciting.
feather_ghyll: Girl reading a book that is resting on her knees (Default)
I was saddened to hear of Diana Wynne Jones's death. Reading her obituary, it was interesting to learn of the links to other children’s fiction writers.

I don't know if I would describe myself as a fan. That is to say, I have enjoyed reading her books if they've come my way - they're witty and have a strong streak of common sense, while very much being fantasy books - but felt no compulsion to keep all of them and get more. I did read some of her books as a child, A Tale of Time City left the most impression and I have vague memories of the Archer's Goon adaptation, but I didn't own any copies of her books as a child, and read more of her work as an adult. I saw the adaptation of Howl's Moving Castle before reading the book; I have a feeling I read (some of) the Chrestomanci books before then.

Anyway, it is sad that there won't be any more books from her.
feather_ghyll: Book shop store front, text reading 'wear the old coat, buy the new book.' (Book not coat)
Since last posting more of my books from my parents' house have come to mine, including a Jeffrey Archer that wasn't mine and went straight into the charity shop bag. I hope to finish filling a second bag before the end of the week, as limited space is making me more ruthless. Not ruthless enough for my mother, and when I think of all the books that are still at theirs, I know that she's right with my head. I'm on the hunt for a bookshelf for a nook upstairs as one I was lent has been returned to its owner. I'm planning to get a taller one, which should help a little with the book piles.

Furthermore, I read Never Let Me Go in advance of the release of the film adaptation. It has haunted me and put me off reading school stories for a little. I then read Magic Flutes by Eva Ibbotson, who has passed away (I was alerted by [livejournal.com profile] callmemadam). I only started reading her books very recently, but I've loved all of them. In fact, Magic Flutes's Tessa brought me to tears twice and I don't easily cry (or like opera). Something about her selflessness touched me. So, I am saddened at the news of her creator.
feather_ghyll: Book shop store front, text reading 'wear the old coat, buy the new book.' (Book not coat)
The news about Woolwoorths turned me into a vulture, but I was sad to hear that apparently, Murder One will close by the end of the month. It's a specialist paperback genre (crime and romance mainly) genre bookshop on Charging Cross Road. Ever since I found it, I always paid it a visit whenever I was in London (but a shop on the street). It isn't realistic for me to go there before the end of the month, sadly.
feather_ghyll: Book shop store front, text reading 'wear the old coat, buy the new book.' (Book not coat)
French page dedicated to Eric Leyland. It states that Leyland was a friend of Captain W. Johns - author of the Biggles books - and also wrote under the pseudonym of Elizabeth Tarrant (I didn't know this, I have one of 'her' books!). There's a full looking bibiliography - though they warn that it isn't necessarily complete, due to the numerous pseuds that he used - with pictures of covers. This suggests that there is a series of Stanton's books (I wonder if they are about Statnon's in its incarnation before 'Stanton's comes of Age' or after?
This
would suggest that it's after.)

Details on the casting for the new Ballet Shoes adaptation. My reaction. ) Also, I really need to reread the book.

The Fossil Cupboard - a message board to discuss Streatfeild's books.

And for Ransome fans, on lj, there's [livejournal.com profile] ransomefans. (I saw a Swallows and Amazons mug of the classic cover, which I had a bit of a struggle over, but couldn't justify buying it right now, 15 % opening weekend discount or no. This was at the new Borders.

P'raps I can engineer a mug-related accident...

Wikipedia offers this list of fictional works invented by EBD (it hurts me a little that they are not chronologically ordered).

[livejournal.com profile] astralis on new girls, honour and girls who don't fit in in girls school stories.

News of two Famous Five productions. Am I the only one who sees the major flaw in looking at the characters' lives decades later? Read more... ). Fan Lucy Mangan weighs in on the subject.

The Series Fic yahoo group - dedicated to exploring British children's series fiction of the 20th and 21st century.

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